Basics: Cord Anatomy

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illustration showing the terms for various cord formations Interrupting our ongoing discourse on good luck knots, I'm going back to basics with an illustration of terms used to describe various cord parts and configurations.

In this definition I have tried to be as formal and precise as possible. Alas that I can't really maintain that level of precision in the rest of my writings. In particular I use "loop" altogether too often...

Standing End, Fixed End, or Bitter End
the end of the cord that receives the least amount of manipulation, perhaps it is heavily embellished or perhaps it is fixed to something.
Working End, Running End, or Live End
the end of the cord that is actively involved in making the knot or interlacing
Standing Part
part of the cord between the knot and the standing end
Working Part
part of the cord between the knot and the working end
Working Length
the amount of cord required to comfortably tie a knot versus the amount of cord required by the tied knot can vary greatly. The working length is the amount of cord required to tie the knot.
Bight
an open loop, a curved section in the cord that does not cross itself
Tied in the Bight
tying a knot by folding the cord and using a bight as the working end
Elbows
two cord segments that cross at two points
Underhand Loop
a closed loop where the working end passes under the standing part
Overhand Loop
a closed loop where the working end passes over the standing part
Turn
where the cord folds over or passes through an object
Round Turn
where the cord encircles an object, sometimes called two turns.
Double x knot
a larger version of the x knot, it's next logical progression. Where applicable, there can be triple, quadruple, quintuple, etc.
Doubled x knot
running a parallel line through knot x to add a decorative element. Similarly the knot x can be tripled, quadrupled, quintupled, etc.
Taxonomy upgrade extras: