Basics: Knot Anatomy: The Making Of: Part 2

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double coin in white cord outlined in blackdouble coin in white cord sidelined in black Since the double coin didn't like being tied in president's cord it seemed best to use regular satin cord and, for colour contrast, outline in black.

A common decorative technique for fancying up your knots (I like to call this illumination) is to take a cord of contrasting colour and pull it through the knot in parallel. When done with a cord of the same colour it is usually called doubling. When done with a cord (usually smaller in size) of contrasting colour, I like to call it sidelining (see right). When both sides of the cord are sidelined, then I call it outlining (see left).

Comments

Bonjour Carol Wang,

I am not at all in "ornamental" but I am prompt to state that I do like the different words that, once the reader has internalized what they denote, immediately impart a lot of information with not a lot of noise marring a very economical signal :
illumination, doubling, sidelining, outlining.
Very clever.( almost mathematical ! ;-) )
Hope it will make 'roots' in the knotting community.
Cordialement.
Charles

PS : the illustrations are very "clear" too. Bravo.

Hey, Charles! Good to "see" you here. While I willingly lay claim to originating the use of the terms "illumination", "sidelining" and "outlining" as applied to knots, "doubling" (and "tripling", etc) have been used for a very long time.

I take the idea of being mathematical as a compliment and hope my work helps people have that a-ha! or eureka! moment.

Totally off-topic, but does anyone else remember some math program that had an a-ha bird character?

Hi,
I'm an ex sailor and got plenty of time to 'play' with rope and string. A good source to learn from would be 'The Ashly Book of Knots'. If a knot exists, it is in there. Its not really for the amature, though there are some simple step by step guides.
One of my 'specialities' is ships Bell Ropes.

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