books

Chinese Knot book 2 cover scan I keep resolving to scan and review my entire knotty (and braid-y) book library, but I've only done one or two so far for the blog.

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Using the Korean keyboard on my iPhone (much nicer than anything I could quickly find online for free), I am able to type the name of the knot I found, and the name of the book I found it in. Let's start with the knot: 당초매듭 (dang-cho-mae-deup) which machine translates as "initially the knot" or "initial knot" a translation that lacks both poetry and, I suspect, gist. But, searching with "당초매듭" finds us this web page: http://blog.daum.net/_blog/BlogView.do?blogid=0BoQ2&articleno=7147932&ca...
which, after I turned off a few security settings, shows us... a creeper knot! Jackpot!

So, back to the book:
in wee little type over the title: 우아한 전통의 (u-a-han jeon-tong-ui)
in big type: 한국애듭 (han-gu-gae-deup)
in teeny tiny type under the title: 김주현 편저 (gim-ju-hyeon pyeon-jeo)

Which Google Translates as: Korea's traditional and elegant knot / endeavor to eds.

Breaking it down, "우아한 전통의" is "elegant traditional", indeed "우아한" == "elegant" and "전통의" == "traditional". "한국" == "(South) Korea" and "애듭" == "knot".

So, I was looking through my Japanese and Korean books looking for creeper and double coin references and came across what looks like a creeper reference in "한국매듭" which I'll blog more about when I figure out how to type Korean (or I could do what I did to get this book title onto the computer which is look at a page of related text and pick out characters to cut and paste together).

woven bao knotsLately I've been working on many different things and for some reason not finishing any of them. *sigh*

So, I've scanned step by step instructions for the double coin knot, creeper knot, cross knot, plafond knot, 2 methods for tying the sauvastika knot, and also the square or flat knot.

You'll notice that most of the links above are what is clearly work in progress and sort of look broken. This is my way. Someday they'll be proper completed pages. Why wait to link? 8)

The Dong-Lim Korean knotting museum in Seoul, Korea has it's own website!! Tell you later after I have at it with some brute force clicking and online translators what especially cool treasures (I hope!) lie within...
http://shimyoungmi.com/

Events
Preparing for their upcoming Paracord contest, Instructables has posted a collection of example paracord projects.
http://www.instructables.com/id/Paracord/

"This week, West Swamp Mennonite Church in Milford is holding its fifth annual knotting marathon called Why Knot." What they're knotting are blankets. I'm not really sure what "knotting comforters" entails, but it certainly sounds like it's for a good cause (sending blankets to Haiti).
http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/news_details/article/92/2010/march/24/kn...

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cover of the Echo edition of Lydia Chen Chinese Knottingcover of the current Tuttle edition of Lydia Chen Chinese KnottingIn print in one form or another pretty much continuously since 1981, this book is responsible for reviving the art of Chinese knotting and likely many cascade effects.

First was the original (Traditional) Chinese edition published in Taiwan (the cover of the original Chinese edition is identical in illustration to the English edition pictured at left but for the title rendered in Chinese text):
中國結
Author: 陳夏生 (Chen Hsia-Sheng, chén xià shēng)
ISBN: ??
Publisher: ECHO Publishing Company; 1 edition (January, 1981)
Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.7 inches

Soon followed by an English edition also published in Taiwan and distributed by Tuttle (see left):
Chinese Knotting
Author: Lydia Chen
ISBN: 0-8048-1389-2
Hardcover: 116 pages
Publisher: ECHO Publishing Company; 1 English edition (January, 1982)
Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.7 inches

The easiest way for me to enter Chinese text is by typing English text and getting something to translate it for me. Generally speaking this does 60% of the job. Then there are the characters that are more difficult to translate, so I need to enter them directly. For this task I like to write the characters into a system that does Chinese handwriting recognition. For this job I used the free iTranslate iPhone app and the nciku dictionary. I used the iTranslate app, mostly because I was out, but it had the added advantage of quickly swapping the Chinese and English back and forth from the translate/translated windows for refinement of the desired characters. Also, unlike the other translation apps on my phone, iTranslate allowed me to get the data out (via email in this case). Apparently iTranslate is "powered by Google" and indeed once I got home I also used Google Translate with largely the same results although there is no handwriting recognition involved there.

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Book Review: The Ashley Book of Knots by Clifford AshleyI want to catalogue my knotty book collection (and braids and any related crafts) and this seems like a good place to do it. Well, the main site is where it should probably end up, but here's a good place to work on it, I can add curating on the other side.

The Ashley Book of Knots
Author: Clifford W. Ashley
ISBN: 0-385-04025-3
Hardcover: 640 pages
Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (June 21, 1944)
Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.6 x 1.6 inches

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Don Burrhus' globe knot tool Don Burrhus has written (at this point) 3 books and sells kits to go with them. Two are about Turks Head Knots and the most recent is about globe knots. I have all of them, but I'll tackle the Turks Head kit and books more thoroughly at a later date.

Pictures
Some wacky artisan (interior design firm??) from the Netherlands is taking spongy looking "cords" and knitting them, they also tie really big knots... just follow the link and look! 8) [via]
http://baukeknottnerus.nl/

Some knotted wallhangings from a cultural website.
http://traditions.cultural-china.com/en/16T1961T4661.html

From the same site comes another set of pictures (note, they translated the button knot as the buckle knot. That confused me for a while...)
http://traditions.cultural-china.com/en/15Traditions335.html

Interesting jewelry. Some knotted, some just evoking knots.
http://cruststation.wordpress.com/2008/12/29/knotted/

Picture of a sizable mystic knot accompanies a blog with numerous links to knotting how-to videos.
http://salamanderart.wordpress.com/2008/12/28/chinese-knot-tying/

Things to see and do

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