creeper

Using the Korean keyboard on my iPhone (much nicer than anything I could quickly find online for free), I am able to type the name of the knot I found, and the name of the book I found it in. Let's start with the knot: 당초매듭 (dang-cho-mae-deup) which machine translates as "initially the knot" or "initial knot" a translation that lacks both poetry and, I suspect, gist. But, searching with "당초매듭" finds us this web page: http://blog.daum.net/_blog/BlogView.do?blogid=0BoQ2&articleno=7147932&ca...
which, after I turned off a few security settings, shows us... a creeper knot! Jackpot!

So, back to the book:
in wee little type over the title: 우아한 전통의 (u-a-han jeon-tong-ui)
in big type: 한국애듭 (han-gu-gae-deup)
in teeny tiny type under the title: 김주현 편저 (gim-ju-hyeon pyeon-jeo)

Which Google Translates as: Korea's traditional and elegant knot / endeavor to eds.

Breaking it down, "우아한 전통의" is "elegant traditional", indeed "우아한" == "elegant" and "전통의" == "traditional". "한국" == "(South) Korea" and "애듭" == "knot".

creeper knot black and white edged in greyFinished adding text to the scanned step-by-step images for the creeper knot. A relatively lonely knot in the Chinese knotting pantheon, it seems to have been not embraced by Japanese or Korean artisans (I have found no mentions and hence no translations). Even Ashley has no mention of it although I did find an extension, the caterpillar knot.

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

woven bao knotsLately I've been working on many different things and for some reason not finishing any of them. *sigh*

So, I've scanned step by step instructions for the double coin knot, creeper knot, cross knot, plafond knot, 2 methods for tying the sauvastika knot, and also the square or flat knot.

You'll notice that most of the links above are what is clearly work in progress and sort of look broken. This is my way. Someday they'll be proper completed pages. Why wait to link? 8)

creeper knot in black, white and greyback of creeper knot in black, white and grey So here's the creeper knot. You'll notice the free ends extending to either side versus the usual free ends making up an ear of the knot. That's because the creeper is meant to wrap around an object, like the bow on a package. The description in the book makes me think that she maybe wanted "vine" versus "creeper" but...

So, having all my components, I started in on the illustrations:

Taxonomy upgrade extras: